1876 Salaries

14 May

In July of 1876, The Brooklyn Argus published the salaries of the two highest paid teams in the newly formed National League; many of these have never appeared in any of the collections of early baseball salaries.

According to the article, the highest paid player was Chicago White Stockings pitcher Albert Goodwill Spalding who “as pitcher and manager, receives $3,000 for the year, with $1,000 bonus for producing the secession from the Hub (Boston) to Chicago.”  (The 1950 book “100 Years of Baseball,” by Lee Allen said Spalding earned $3,500 and a $500 bonus for the season).

A.G. Spalding, highest paid in National League

A.G. Spalding, highest paid in National League

The three players Spalding brought with him from the Boston Red Stockings in the National Association, Catcher James “Deacon” White, first baseman Cal McVey and second baseman Ross Barnes were all paid $2,500.  The two players signed away from the Philadelphia Athletics, third baseman Adrian “Cap” Anson and outfielder Bob Addy received $2,200 and $1,500 respectively.

Outfielder Paul Hines earned 1.800, utility player Fred Andrus was paid 1,000, and the remaining members of the first National League Champions, shortstop John Peters and outfielders John Glenn and Oscar Bielaski were made $1500 each.

Chicago White Stockings, 1876 National League Champions--and highest salaried team.

Chicago White Stockings, 1876 National League Champions–and highest salaried team.

Harry Wright’s Boston Red Stockings filled the vacancies of White and Barnes with 18-year-old Lew Brown and 21-year-old John Morrill who The Argus said received “between 800 to 1000 dollars each.”

Manager Wright, who only appeared in one game, and his brother George were the highest paid members of the Boston club at $2,500 each.  Andy Leonard, who played second and outfield was paid $2,000.  Two other notable players on the Red Stockings, Hall of Famer “Orator Jim” O’Rourke and Tim Murnane received “between fifteen hundred and eighteen hundred dollars.”

According to The Argus, the White Stockings payroll of $21,500 topped the league, with Boston’s total of 18,000.

Advertisements

13 Responses to “1876 Salaries”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. “Offered him $1,000 to Throw the Game” | Baseball History Daily - August 21, 2013

    […] announced that the “charges were not sustained.”  The only fallout from the scandal was that Bob Addy replaced McGeary as manager for the final seven regular season […]

  2. “Eighteen Thousand Dollars Squandered by Chicago” | Baseball History Daily - August 22, 2013

    […] team played what Wood called their “first real game,” against Al Spalding and the Forest Citys in Rockford, Illinois and despite the Rockford fans backing “their team […]

  3. “Chicago has been Successful in her Efforts to Wrest the Base Ball Supremacy from Cincinnati” | Baseball History Daily - August 26, 2013

    […] Gazette also noted George Wright’s absence as “a serious drawback upon the nine, and they do not now play with the vim and […]

  4. “Clark Griffith nearly Ended the Life of William Phyle” | Baseball History Daily - November 19, 2013

    […] he went duck hunting with teammates Clark Griffith, Bill Lange, Jack Taylor and Jimmy Callahan at A.G. Spalding’s New Mexico ranch.  The Inter Ocean said of the […]

  5. ” I had Lamed my Shoulder with Cricket Playing | Baseball History Daily - December 5, 2013

    […] injury might affect Thompson led The Cincinnati Enquirer to talk to “the old man of base-ball” Harry Wright about the art of […]

  6. Al Reach | Baseball History Daily - December 12, 2013

    […] the end of the decade Reach’s company was purchased by A.G. Spalding, with Reach staying on as an executive and the company continued to produce equipment with the […]

  7. Lost Advertisements–”Now he is a Man with a Sound Body” | Baseball History Daily - December 13, 2013

    […] advertisement featuring George Wright, which appeared in newspapers across the country, and presented as a regular news story, for […]

  8. Harry Wright Returns to Cincinnati | Baseball History Daily - December 17, 2013

    […] 1871 Harry Wright took several of his Red Stockings players, as well as the team name, moved to Boston and joined the […]

  9. Alternate Uniforms, Circa 1879 | Baseball History Daily - February 14, 2014

    […] John Peters: Green […]

  10. “I Believe that a Pitcher of a Slow Ball could make Monkeys out of Opposing Batsmen” | Baseball History Daily - May 21, 2014

    […] the curve ball—his claim was supported by influential voices like A.G. Spalding, Cap Anson,  and Tim Murnane—culminated with his 1908 “Baseball Magazine” article “How I Pitched the First Curve,” […]

  11. “It may well be Doubted whether Beals should be Permitted to play Second Base again” | Baseball History Daily - July 23, 2014

    […] an act of piracy on the Lowell Club of which it ought to be ashamed, by jerking (John) Morrill and (Lew) Brown out of the Lowell nine in regular highwayman fashion, both these players being then under contract […]

  12. “Go Back to Old Kentucky” | Baseball History Daily - September 26, 2014

    […] June 29, 1897 “Cap” Anson’s Chicago Colts defeated Fred Clarke’s Louisville Colonels by scoring more runs than any team […]

  13. “The Farce of the Season” | Baseball History Daily - November 26, 2014

    […] paper said one of the Fairies—Genevieve McAllister—“wields the willow after the style of Jim O’Rourke,” and Clara Corcoran, who played third base was said to be the niece of Chicago White Stockings […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s