Tag Archives: Carrie Moyer

“Her Pitching is Free, Easy, and Graceful”

31 Jan

“What do you think of a twirler who is a girl?” Asked The Brooklyn Citizen in 1906.

“Perhaps some day Cy Young and Christy Mathewson will give way to a pleasant faced young lady who will proceed to make the batters puncture the air with holes and simply froth at their inability to solve her delivery.”

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The “pleasant faced young lady” was Carrie Moyer, the “daughter of a baker” from Macungie, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Allentown. Moyer had recently shut out a local semi-pro club “the strong Temperance team,” on just two hits over eight innings while pitching for the Allentown Moxies.

It wasn’t the first notice Moyer had received for her pitching ability; The Allentown Leader said earlier that summer:

“She has a deceptive delivery of curves and other ways of fooling a batsman. Her speed is remarkable for a girl and she seems not to mind the exertion necessary as a pitcher.”

The Washington Post described her curve ball:

“She gives to her ball a peculiar twist, which disconcerts a batter far more than the speediest straight-liner. Her pitching is free, easy, and graceful, and she possesses remarkable endurance.”

The paper quoted one of her opponents:

“Just when you have about measured the distance where you are going to land that ball, it is safe in the hands of the catcher.”

The Post also assured readers that Moyer was “not mannish in nature,” and “the last person in the world one would take as possessing any knowledge of the national game, much less playing it.”

Moyer was paid through the summer of 1906 to pitch for various semi-pro clubs in the area; The Citizen said the money was earmarked for tuition to “music school in New York.”

Moyer’s brother Willis was her usual catcher until he crushed his thumb in an accident in the family bakery in 1909; despite losing her catcher, she kept pitching.

Moyer left music school and later attended Hood College. The Baltimore Sun said shortly after she graduated from the school in June of 1912 that she “decided to abandon the game,” after she turned down an offer to pitch against a club in Frederick, Maryland.

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Moyer, 1935

After baseball, Moyer entered another male dominated field, and according to The Allentown Morning Call, in 1935, she was “one of the two women state fingerprint experts in the country.” Moyer was employed by the Bureau of Criminal Identification of the State of Massachusetts; ten years later she became supervisor of the Massachusetts Bureau of Criminal Investigations.

She died February 11,1979 at age 89.