Lost Advertisements–Hans Wagner Says!!!

11 Oct

hans

 

A 1910 advertisement for Coca-Cola featuring Honus Wagner (a 1908 Wagner Coke ad was featured in an earlier post).

You can’t play good ball without vim–you’ve got to be full of enthusiasm and energy and keep your brain going–always.

You can’t afford to take alcoholic  stimulants or anything that has a “let-down” after effect.

Coca-cola

is the only beverage I have ever drunk that had vim, vigor and go to it–that quenched the thirst and assisted my mental and physical activity.

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6 Responses to “Lost Advertisements–Hans Wagner Says!!!”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. “As an Actor? Well—” | Baseball History Daily - December 23, 2013

    […] returned to the Giants in 1908 and hit .334, finishing second to Pittsburgh’s Honus Wagner (.354).  But Donlin caught the acting bug while traveling with Hite, and upon embarking on the […]

  2. “Fatty Weakened and Portland scored four runs” | Baseball History Daily - January 24, 2014

    […] and Lloyd of the Chicago Colored Giants who play out here every spring.  I think Lloyd is another Hans Wagner around shortstop and Petway is one of the greatest catchers in the […]

  3. “Father isn’t Disappointed because I took up Dancing” | Baseball History Daily - April 4, 2014

    […] Shortstop: Honus Wagner […]

  4. “What Right has Hanlon to Show me How to Hit?” | Baseball History Daily - June 23, 2014

    […] great rival in the National League Honus Wagner is just the opposite.  Hans grabs his stick at the end, holds it high about his shoulders, and […]

  5. Wagner’s Mysterious Bat | Baseball History Daily - August 20, 2014

    […] 1911 Honus Wagner hit .334, it was his thirteenth straight season hitting better than .320, but he still wondered how […]

  6. Things I Learned on the Way to Looking Up Other Things #18 | Baseball History Daily - March 7, 2016

    […] and draw your own conclusions.  When I say this I am well aware of the claims of Ed Delehanty, Hans Wagner and many other great hitters.  I give them all due credit, but in my opinion, Anson was the […]

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