Tag Archives: Lost Advertisements

Lost Advertisements–Falstaff Game of the Day

23 Nov

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A 1952 advertisement for the Falstaff Game of the Day over the Mutual Broadcasting Network:

“Falstaff brings you Dizzy Dean–baseball’s most colorful and exciting commentator!  Al Helfer, regular Falstaff–Mutual Network announcer…Diz will be teamed with Al for many of these exciting Major League broadcasts.”

 

Lost Advertisements: Designed by Babe Ruth

16 Nov

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“Here they are for you fellows,” a 1927 ad for “The Babe Ruth Home Run Specials” from Reach:

“At Last–every fellow who plays ball can have the kind of mitt or glove he’s always wanted.  Not small size, shoddy gloves.  Not the cheap-looking, cheap-wearing kids that go to pieces in a single season.  But Full-sized Big League gloves.”

The Babe Ruth Specials retailed from $3.50 to $5.00  The catcher’s mitt was $8.

Lost Advertisements: Satch’s Palm Springs No-Show

13 Jul

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An advertisement for the October 1950 game between Bob Lemon‘s All-Stars and Satchel Paige‘s All-Stars at Polo Grounds in Palm Springs–later the Spring Training home of the Los Angeles Angels–both the Pacific Coast League and American League clubs, currently known as Palm Springs Stadium.

According to The Desert Sun, Paige instead “(A)ccepted a lucrative offer to pitch a series of Hawaii exhibition games,” and failed to appear in Palm Springs.

Just 639 fans came out to watch Lemon and a team comprised of Indians teammates and PCL players beat the Paige-less Kansas City Royals 9 to 3.

The most notable aspect of the game was Indians second baseman Ray Boone had his wrist broken with a pitch in the first inning–Boone who hit .301 for Cleveland in 1950, hit just .233 in 1951 after the injury.

Lost Advertisements: Jesse Haines, Mail Pouch Tobacco

6 Jul

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“You don’t get tired of Mail Pouch.” 1930 advertisement for Mail Pouch Tobacco featuring St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Jesse Haines.

In 1927, on his way to his best season–24-10, 2.72 ERA–soon to be 33-years old-Haines won his first five decisions.  Lynn Carlisle “L.C.” Davis, sports columnist and “resident bard” of The St. Louis Post-Dispatch wrote “An Appreciation” to commemorate Haines’ fast start:

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L.C. Davis

Old Jesse Haines is going great,

More honor to his name!

The grand old man has won five straight

And hasn’t lost a game.

That good old Jess can win em all,

The patrons don’t expect;

But with his famous knuckle ball

The batters can’t connect.

Whenever Jess is on the hill

Or so-called pitching mound,

In lieu of landing on the pill,

The air the batters pound.

In fact the Red Bird’s pitching staff

Is pretty hard to beat.

Into the foe they ease the gaff

In manner that is neat.

Lost Advertisements: Independence Day–National Foundation Baseball Day

4 Jul

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A 1959 advertisement for The National Foundation–originally the National Foundation for Infant Paralysis founded by Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1938, and better known for by the name coined by actor Eddie Cantor for their primary fundraising campaign, the March of Dimes.

“Help strike out polio,arthritis, virus diseases, birth defects”

Professional and amateur teams raised money an awareness for polio– there were more new cases of paralytic polo in 1959 than any year since the Salk vaccine was introduced in 1955.

Several professional teams pledged to donate a portion of the 4th of July gate, as they had in 1958–the ad for the 1958 “National Foundation Baseball Day”is below.

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Lost Advertisements: “Mail Pouch Gets my Money”

22 Jun

A 1930 Mail Pouch Chewing Tobacco ad featuring Chicago Cubs catcher Zack Taylor:

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Taylor, according to Jimmy Dykes, was a major factor in the Philadelphia Athletics’ 4 games to 1 victory over Chicago in the 1929 World Series.  According to The Philadelphia Record, Dykes told attendees at a lunch for the Delaware County Real Estate Board:

“We didn’t watch for signals in that 10 to 8 game where we scored 10 runs in the seventh inning, but in all the other World Series games we knew the Cubs’ signals.

“We worked it this way: When one of our batters got on base, he would fix his eyes on Taylor…who at times, was a little careless.   The runner would stand in a perfectly natural position until he caught the signal, then he would move his hand in such a way that the batter was informed what kind of a ball was a about to be pitched, or else a man near the batter would catch the runner’s signal and relay it to the man at the plate.”

Dykes was ridiculed for the claim.

Davis Walsh, the baseball writer for the International News Service, noted that the Athletics left 27 men on base during the four games Dykes said they were stealing signs.

Damon Runyon, in his column for the Hearst paper’s Universal Service, said Walsh showed “By facts and figures that if the Athletics had the Cubs signs the only bewildered the Athletics.”

Dykes hit .421 with four RBI in the four-game series.

Lost Advertisements–Jack Lapp for Sweet Caporal

17 Jul

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A 1914 advertisement for Sweet Caporal Cigarettes featuring Jack Lapp, “One of the brilliant young catchers of the World’s Champion Athletics.”

“When you’re out of Sweets, you’re minus the best cigarette a man can smoke.  The real tobacco flavor of Sweet Caporal is immense.”

Lapp’s career ended at age 31 in 1916, when various illnesses forced his retirement.

The catcher died in 1920 of Pneumonia.

 

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Lapp

 

Connie Mack said of Lapp:

“When in his prime, he was the greatest of American League catchers.  Few realized the greatness of Jack, but for those who knew baseball, he was held in high esteem.”

Lost Advertisements–“They all use The Spalding”

27 Aug

 

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A 1912 Spalding advertisement featuring Connie Mack, Hughie Jennings, and Harry Davis that appeared in West Coast newspapers after the rubber-centered Goldsmith baseball replaced the cork-centered Spalding as the official ball of the Pacific Coast League:

“They all use the Spalding Cork Center Ball, the only Official Ball, the only Ball recognized by the Official Baseball Rules, and the only ball that can be played with in the world series games for the next 20 years.  Do you realize this?  Every professional baseball player, every professional baseball manager, every professional club owner should insist upon the Cork Center Ball, the Standard Baseball, the Official Ball of the World Series.

Of what value are players’ percentages to compare with the records of the National and American leagues unless they play with The Spalding Cork Center ‘Official National League’ Baseball $1.25 Each.”

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Another 1912 advertisement for the Spalding “Cork-Center Ball”

Lost Advertisements–Southern League Opener, Memphis, 1919

29 Jul

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An advertisement for the Memphis Chickasaws 1919 home opener against the Little Rock Travelers at Memphis’ Russwood Park:

“Some Faces You’ll See at the Opening Ball Game

“‘Fan.’ A hard loser but a game fan–you’ll like him too

“And when ‘Cy’ (Memphis manager, outfielder and pitcher Eros Bolivar “Cy” Barger) pounds the pill for a homer with a couple of Chick sluggers on the bases, there is going to be some faces from Little Rock that are going to show the shock…

“‘Fan.’ With the winning smile, that makes you happy.

“If ‘Cy’ hits a home run.

“In the first game of the season–if he wallops that old pill over the right field fence–you’ll see this happy grin on a thousand faces…The artist couldn’t draw a face that would show the consternation, the gloom, the lost-heartedness depicted. on the face of the Little Rock fans who are rash enough to follow the Travelers to Memphis, should old Cy smash that pill over the fence and into the bleachers.

“But Cy’s Chickasaws have to beat somebody in the opening game at home and it might as well be Little Rock.

“‘Fan.’ Whose grandma dies about this time every year.

“‘Fanette.’  Who says she is going to see every game.

“No!  Memphis isn’t full of sport ‘Pikers.’ We’re going to break the attendance record and win the cup to show the Southern League how much we appreciate their electing the greatest true-blooded sportsman in the South for its president.  And because he hails from Memphis we’re not going to let him feel sorry for it.  We know the man and know we’ll get the good, clean game we’ve wanted in our national sport for the last ten years if we’ll support him as loyally as he’ll support us.”

The new league president referenced in the ad was John Donelson Martin, a Memphis attorney, who later became a federal judge.

The mention of the need for a “good, clean game” refers to the lingering concerns in Memphis about the integrity of the league which began when the Memphis Egyptians collapsed in the last three weeks of the 1907 season, giving the pennant to the Atlanta Crackers, after holding a wire-to-wire lead.

As for the opener, the Chickasaws lost to Little Rock 4-2.  Things never got better for the team, which finished fifth with a 66-79 record.

Cy Barger

Cy Barger

Cy Barger didn’t hit a home run on Opening Day, he didn’t hit a home run all season.  In 1758 at bats during a 16-year professional career (seven in the major leagues) Barger hit a total of four.

Lost Advertisements–“Napoleon Lajoie Official League Ball”

15 Jul

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A 1906 advertisement for “The Napoleon Lajoie Official League Ball”  The $1.25 ball was produced “by special contract” by P. Goldsmith’s Sons–Phillip Goldsmith’s took over the Goldsmith Sporting Goods Companys and moved it from Covington Kentucky across the Ohio River to Cincinnati, Ohio after his death in 1894.

The ball was “(M)ade according to the requirements and specifications of the Major Leagues.  The highest quality materials are used in its construction and each ball is guaranteed for a full game of nine innings.”

There is no evidence that ball was produced in large quantities, and no ads appeared afeter 1906.