Lost Advertisements–Connie Mack Day in Cleveland

6 Sep

???????????????????????????????

A 1938 Advertisement printed in Cleveland newspapers for Connie Mack Day.

The Philadelphia Athletics manager was honored on June 19 in front of 20,000 fans at Cleveland Stadium.  The ad listed every “star player developed by the grand old man of baseball.”

The baseball world pays tribute to that grand master of the National Game

Connie Mack

President and Manager of the Athletics

Connie Mack’s major league career dates back to 1886–52 years ago.

He became an American League manager in 1900 and had served as manager of the Athletics from 1901 to date–the longest record of continuous managerial service in the entire history of the sport.

He has to his credit nine American League pennants (1902, 1905, 1910, 1911, 1913, 1914, 1929, 1930, 1931) and five world championships (1910, 1911, 1913, 1929, 1930).

The list of star players discovered and developed by him is a tremendous honor roll to his credit.

His city has awarded him the $10,000 annual award for outstanding performance to the credit of Philadelphia.

A kindlier man never lived.  A greater baseball strategist never lived.  We do ourselves credit to honor this great sportsman and gentleman.

The Cleveland Plain Dealer said Mack was presented with “a handsomely bound leather book in which were the signatures of every person in organized baseball from Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis down to the greenest rookie in the West Texas-New Mexico League.”  Cleveland’s baseball writers also presented Mack with an engraved gold pencil.

The Plain Dealer and The Cleveland News both noted that when Mack addressed the crowd he added an “n” to Indians president Alva Bradley’s first name; The Plain Dealer said:

“Mr. Mack always had a tough time with names of his friends and players.  For years he has called ‘Lefty’ Grove ‘Groves’ and Lou Gehrig “Garridge.’ In fact he never has attempted to call his second baseman, (Dario) Lodigiani, anything but ‘Lodi’ for this season.”

The league-leading Indians beat Mack’s Athletics 5 to 4.

Advertisements

14 Responses to “Lost Advertisements–Connie Mack Day in Cleveland”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Rube and Ossee | Baseball History Daily - March 10, 2014

    […] Connie Mack’s Philadelphia Athletics were expected to repeat as American League champions in 1906.  The 1905 team won 92 games, finishing two games ahead of the Chicago White Sox, and lost to the New York Giants in the World Series. […]

  2. “There will be Cliches” | Baseball History Daily - June 30, 2014

    […] Ewing, (Jack) Clements, (Charlie) Bennett, (Charlie) Ganzel, (George “Doggie’) Miller, (Connie) Mack, (Michael “King”) Kelly, (John “Jocko”) Milligan, (Paul) Cook and […]

  3. “It was one of those Lucky Days when a Player can hit a pea” | Baseball History Daily - August 8, 2014

    […] was right up on Washington Heights last season, when we were playing the Philadelphia Athletics.  Connie Mack had saved Rube Waddell for us, and the famous southpaw never had more speed or better benders.  […]

  4. Things I Learned on the Way to Looking up other Things #11 | Baseball History Daily - September 22, 2014

    […] Connie Mack—Shrewd and clever; knows the game better than anyone. […]

  5. Bad Bill Eagan | Baseball History Daily - October 6, 2014

    […] 1899 Connie Mack told The Philadelphia North […]

  6. Things I Learned on the Way to Looking up other Things #12 | Baseball History Daily - November 3, 2014

    […] them struck him in the ankle, causing a painful bruise.  He limped to first base and for a while (Connie) Mack was afraid he couldn’t go on with the […]

  7. “The Annual Spring Typhoon has Blown up Again” | Baseball History Daily - November 10, 2014

    […] Comiskey and (Connie) Mack hew closer to the line than any others in Ban Johnson’s circle, and yet these two have won more […]

  8. “Take a Chance, any time, and Fight all the Time” | Baseball History Daily - December 19, 2014

    […] up in more rows than any big league manager; but he has also been mixed up in more pennants… (Connie)Mack is his only rival for the title of greatest manager in the game and no two men in the world were […]

  9. “Signals had a lot to do with our Winning the Championship” | Baseball History Daily - January 16, 2015

    […] or base runner could have looked square into the catcher’s glove and never had gotten these.  (Connie) Mack’s men failed to get a sign of ours in the series so far as I […]

  10. “He is a $900 Man” | Baseball History Daily - July 6, 2015

    […] for my going with the American League in the first place, but after I had given my word to go with Connie Mack’s team I did not feel like breaking it. Then came the decision in the (Napoleon) Lajoie case, and […]

  11. “He was the Greatest Receiving Catcher” | Baseball History Daily - September 23, 2015

    […] later, Connie Mack told Harry Grayson of the Newspaper Enterprise Association that Schrecongost was “the fizz powder […]

  12. Collins’ “Ten Commandments” | Baseball History Daily - October 5, 2015

    […] is a whole lot like playing baseball under Connie Mack’s orders.  Mack is the greatest baseball general the world has ever known and any man who has […]

  13. Connie Mack vs Herman W. Souse | Baseball History Daily - November 6, 2015

    […] his autobiography “My 66 Years in the Big leagues,” Connie Mack said, “My first great disappointment came in […]

  14. “He Used to Knock Down Infielders” | Baseball History Daily - July 23, 2016

    […]  In 1909 Billy Sunday called him “the greatest outfielder in baseball history.”  Connie Mack called him the best base-runner he ever saw.  In fact,  Mack and Clark Griffith considered Lange […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s