Tag Archives: Jim Bagby

“Is Another Crazy Schmidt.”

16 Jun

Thirty-five years after it was first reported that Fred “Crazy” Schmit (often misspelled Schmidt) kept a “book” on hitters, the practice was still considered odd.

crazyschmit

Crazy Schmit

News of Schmit’s “book,” kept largely it was said because of his poor memory, first appeared in 1894 in The Sporting Life:

 “(A)n account of the weakness at bat of his opponents, setting them down in a small book, which he always carried with him on the diamond.”

An International News Service article in 1919 said Cleveland Indians pitcher Jim Bagby:

bagby

Jim Bagby

“Is another Crazy Schmidt.”

According to the article:

“Every pitcher in the big show has first-hand information regarding the hitting ability of every player, but few, if any, have as near perfect a record on the batters as Jim Bagby, one of Lee Fohl’s pitching aces.  Bagby has a system of baseball bookkeeping that is unique and he has found it valuable in his career as a pitcher.

“Some years ago when Jim was setting the Southern League on fire he fell upon the idea of keeping tab on individual batters and also the different teams as a whole.  He did this with aid of a memorandum.

“After each game Bagby would record the success or failure of this or that batter, adding such notes regarding the batter’s style as he deemed useful for future reference and guidance.  Jim was so successful that season (1914, Bagby was 20-9 with a 2.20 ERA for the New Orleans Pelicans) that he has continued the practice.”

When asked whether he still “kept book,” Bagby:

“(A)nswered in the affirmative. The same system that worked so well in the Southern League has been just as effective in the American.”

Bagby was 17-11 with a 2.80 ERA; the following season he was 31-12 with a 2.89 ERA—he finished his career with a 127-89 record and 3.11 ERA.

Crazy Schmitt was 7-36 with a 5.45 ERA in parts of five seasons in the major leagues.

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Lost Advertisements–25 Pictures of the Baseball Stars

15 Nov

bostonstoreadAn April 1917 advertisement for the Boston Store baseball card set at the chain’s Chicago store located on Madison Street between State and Dearborn. The 200 card set was sold in groups of 25 for 2 cents. This ad was for cards numbers 1 through 25.

 

bostonstore

“Most every Fan will want a set, and surely every boy in town will–for baseball is destined to be more popular than ever before.  Here are 25 pictures, each size 3 1/4 x 2 inches, that look exactly like photographs, all new and up-to-date, of the most popular players at the very low price of 2 cents.

“You won’t take a quarter or more for the set once you see it.  Special to-day on Seventh Floor (No Mail or Telephone Orders Filled).  While 5,000 sets last at the extremely low price of 2 cents for the set of 25 pictures.”

 

Joe Benz, Chicago White Sox, Boston Store card

Joe Benz, Chicago White Sox, Boston Store card

The Boston Store card reverse

The Boston Store card reverse

 

The First 25:

Sam Agnew

Grover C. Alexander

W.E. Alexander

Leon Ames

Fred Anderson

Ed Appleton

Jimmy Archer

Jimmy Austin

Jim Bagby

H.D. Baird

Frank Baker

Dave Bancroft

Jack Barry

Joe Benz

Al Betzel

Ping Bodie

Joe Boehling

Eddie Burns

George Burns

George J. Burns

Joe Bush

Owen Bush

Bobbie Byrne

Forrest Cady

Max Carey