Tag Archives: Jimmy Archer

Murphy’s “Billion Dollar Team”

17 Aug

“Money will not buy a pennant winner;” so said William George “Billy” Murphy, the sports editor of The St. Louis Star.  In 1914, he set out to select a team that not even “John D. Rockefeller… (With) all his wealth could buy a club that would win a World’s championship from the one we have picked…The Billion Dollar Team.”

Murphy said:

“You fans of towns that have never won a flag, how would you feel to wake up some morning and find that Dame Fortune had so arranged matters that this club had suddenly been picked to represent your fair city.”

Jimmy Archer, catcher

Behind the plate he acknowledged “There are many who would doubtless pick (John) Chief Meyers…but considering the Indian’s slowness of foot and propensity for clogging up the bases and stealing when the bags are full, we must remark we cannot see the “Chief” for a minute with Jimmy Archer, who, although not so good a hitter, is faster, a quicker thinker, greater fielder and better pegger.”

Jimmy Archer

Jimmy Archer

Murphy was in the minority questioning the baseball intelligence of Meyers, who was widely considered one of the most intelligent and articulate players of his era.  He also rated Ray Schalk and Wally Schang as superior, saying:

“In the writer’s humble opinion they are much more valuable men to their team than Meyers.”

Walter Johnson, pitcher

“There will hardly be a dissenting vote cast against Walter Johnson.  Unquestionably he is the greatest of all the pitchers.

(Charles Chief) Bender and (Christy) Mathewson are also great—great when they should show class—in championship games.  Every nerve, every fiber of their brains, every muscle necessary to their craft, is at its best when big games are being fought.

“Wonderful as they are, we must pick Johnson, who also has class and is game to the core.”

Hal Chase, first base

“For first base, there is only Hal Chase.  He is a great hitter, marvelous fielder, can run the sacks, and is a brilliant tactician.

(John) ‘Stuffy’ McInnis, Jake Daubert, Eddie Konetchy, Fred Merkle, and Jack (Dots) Miller are all stars, but they are ‘also rans’ in the class with Prince Hal of the White Sox.”

Prince Hal of the White Sox

Prince Hal of the White Sox

Eddie Collins, second base

“At second base, Eddie Collins in the potentate.  Johnny Evers, Larry Doyle, and Larry Lajoie occupy seats in the second sackers’ hall of fame, but Collins rules over the roost.”

Honus Wagner, shortstop

“At short, notwithstanding his age, the palm goes to Hans Wagner.  Taken all in all he is still the greatest man at the position in the game.  He can do everything and does it better than any of his contemporaries.  When will we look upon his like again?”

Frank Baker, third base

“At third base, there is that wonderful silent son of swat, Frank Baker, the conqueror of the wonderful Mathewson and Richard (Rube) Marquard.”

Joe Jackson, right field

“In right field we have Joe Jackson, the young Southerner with the Cleveland club.  He is one of the greatest batsmen in the game today and is a fielder and base runner of unusual ability.”

Joe Jackson

Joe Jackson

Ty Cobb, center field

“In center, there is Tyrus Raymond Cobb, the Royston, Georgia marvel, who is the greatest player baseball has ever known.”

Tris Speaker, left field

“And in left field, there is Tris Speaker of the Boston Red Sox—second only to Cobb.”

Lost Advertisements–“Yell For Your Team–And Help Them Win”

6 Dec

cubssoxmegaphoneA 1912 advertisement for a free megaphone available from “the driver of any one of The Chicago Examiner automobiles at ballpark.”

The Chicago Cubs and White Sox played 25 City Series’ between 1903 and 1942 (not including their World Series in 1906).  The first, in 1903 ended in a tie–both teams winning seven games before the series was forced to end because the player’s contracts had expired.  The Cubs won in 1905 and 1909, but the Sox won 18 of the next 22.

The 1912 series began with a 0-0 tie.  White Sox pitcher “Big Ed” Walsh held the Cubs to just one hit–a Joe Tinker double.   Cubs pitcher Jimmy Lavender held the Sox to six.

The highlight of the game came in the second inning.  With “Ping” Bodie on third and Rollie Zeider at bat.  The Chicago Tribune said:

“Zeider took a spitter for one ball, then hit the second for a high bounder to (Heinie) Zimmerman.  Bodie tried to score, but Zimmerman ran in stabbed the ball with his bare hand and got Bodie at the plate.”

The picture shows where Zimmerman was playing Zeider (B) and where he fielded the ball (A).

The picture shows where Zimmerman was playing Zeider (B) and where he fielded the ball (A).  Ping Bodie is tagged out by Cubs catcher Jimmy Archer.

The second game of the series also ended in a tie, 3 to 3.  The Cubs then won three straight, but the White Sox came back and won four in a row to take the series.

The 31-year-old Walsh, who was 27-17 in 62 games (41 starts, 32 complete games) and 393 innings pitched,  appeared in six games for the Sox, starting four.  He would only win 13 more games over parts of the next five seasons.

cubssoxmegaphone1912

1912 Cubs/Sox Megaphone coupon from The Chicago Examiner

Lost Advertisements–25 Pictures of the Baseball Stars

15 Nov

bostonstoreadAn April 1917 advertisement for the Boston Store baseball card set at the chain’s Chicago store located on Madison Street between State and Dearborn. The 200 card set was sold in groups of 25 for 2 cents. This ad was for cards numbers 1 through 25.

 

bostonstore

“Most every Fan will want a set, and surely every boy in town will–for baseball is destined to be more popular than ever before.  Here are 25 pictures, each size 3 1/4 x 2 inches, that look exactly like photographs, all new and up-to-date, of the most popular players at the very low price of 2 cents.

“You won’t take a quarter or more for the set once you see it.  Special to-day on Seventh Floor (No Mail or Telephone Orders Filled).  While 5,000 sets last at the extremely low price of 2 cents for the set of 25 pictures.”

 

Joe Benz, Chicago White Sox, Boston Store card

Joe Benz, Chicago White Sox, Boston Store card

The Boston Store card reverse

The Boston Store card reverse

 

The First 25:

Sam Agnew

Grover C. Alexander

W.E. Alexander

Leon Ames

Fred Anderson

Ed Appleton

Jimmy Archer

Jimmy Austin

Jim Bagby

H.D. Baird

Frank Baker

Dave Bancroft

Jack Barry

Joe Benz

Al Betzel

Ping Bodie

Joe Boehling

Eddie Burns

George Burns

George J. Burns

Joe Bush

Owen Bush

Bobbie Byrne

Forrest Cady

Max Carey