Tag Archives: Rollie Zeider

Lost Advertisements–Anheuser-Busch, Washington Senators

5 Feb

 

ab1910sox

In 1910, a series of Anheuser-Busch ads  appeared in several Washington D.C. papers. The ad above appeared when the Chicago White Sox faced the Senators in early May:

Comiskey’s New White Sox are in Town

The headline referred to Charles Comiskey‘s shakeup of his team, which included the appointment of Hugh Duffy as manager, and a new starting infield; first baseman Chick Gandil, second baseman Rollie Zeider, and shortstop Lena Blackburne, and Billy Purtell at third.

An advertisement later that week featured caricatures of Napoleon Lajoie and Hughie Jennings, and described Rube Waddell as “The only wild animal of his kind in captivity:”

ab1910nap

The ads were similar in style and content to those for Old Underoof Whiskey that appeared in Chicago papers during the same period–all advertised upcoming games, commented on the behavior of fans and players, and chronicled the year’s pennant races–with one exception.

A July ad featured the full text, with illustrations, of Ernest Thayer’s “Casey at the Bat:”

ab1910casey

They only appeared for one season.

 

Lost Advertisements–Fit for a King

1 May

fitAn ad for Old Underoof Whiskey from April of 1910.  Chicago White Sox owner Charles Comiskey–and Chicago fans–had great expectations for the club.  After a disappointing 78-74 record and a fourth-place finish in 1909, Hugh Duffy was hired to replace Billy Sullivan as manager.

Comiskey also replaced his entire starting infield, purchasing the contracts of three minor leaguers: first baseman Chick Gandil, second baseman Rollie Zeider, and shortstop Lena Blackburne, and installing utility infielder Billy Purtell at third.

The new 1910 White Sox infield.

The new 1910 White Sox infield.

The Chicago Tribune said the Sox were now:

“Resplendent with brand new darns where were worn the biggest holes last year.”

Comiskey was confident enough to tell reporters the team “(W)ill lose their name of hitless wonders this year. I am confident we will be as strong as any club in the league in this department.”

He also maintained that Ed Walsh, Doc White, Jim Scott, and Frank Smith, who would start the opener on April 14, comprised “(T)he strongest staff of pitchers in any league.”

The Sox did not disappoint on opening day.  Behind Smith’s one-hitter, the Sox defeated the St. Louis Browns 3 to 0.

The Chicago Inter Ocean said the “New Sox lived up to every inch of the reputation they have gained this spring.” The Tribune dubbed the team “Commy’s Comets,” and said:

“When the dazzling display was over Comiskey’s face resembled the noonday sun wreathed in an aureole of smiles, which extended beyond the rings of Saturn and half the distance to the milky way.”

Old Underoof commemorated the victory with a new ad:

commy1910

The Sox quickly returned to earth and lost their next four games.  Things never got much better.  A month into the season they were 10 games out of first place; they finished 68-85, in sixth-place 35.5 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

With a league-worst .211 batting average, the they failed to ” lose their name of hitless wonders,” as Comiskey predicted.

As for “the strongest staff of pitchers in any league,” they could not overcome the horrible support they received all season.  Despite a 2.03 team ERA, second only to Philadelphia’s 1.79, only Doc White (15-13) had a winning record.

Walsh, who led the league with a 1.27 ERA,  was 18-20, and Scott was 8-18 with a 2.43 ERA.

Frank Smith, the 30-year-old hero of the opener, who had won 25 games with a 1.80 ERA in 1909, was 4-9, despite a 2.03 ERA and three shutouts, when he was traded with Billy Purtell to the Boston Red Sox in August.

 

 

Lost Advertisements–“Yell For Your Team–And Help Them Win”

6 Dec

cubssoxmegaphoneA 1912 advertisement for a free megaphone available from “the driver of any one of The Chicago Examiner automobiles at ballpark.”

The Chicago Cubs and White Sox played 25 City Series’ between 1903 and 1942 (not including their World Series in 1906).  The first, in 1903 ended in a tie–both teams winning seven games before the series was forced to end because the player’s contracts had expired.  The Cubs won in 1905 and 1909, but the Sox won 18 of the next 22.

The 1912 series began with a 0-0 tie.  White Sox pitcher “Big Ed” Walsh held the Cubs to just one hit–a Joe Tinker double.   Cubs pitcher Jimmy Lavender held the Sox to six.

The highlight of the game came in the second inning.  With “Ping” Bodie on third and Rollie Zeider at bat.  The Chicago Tribune said:

“Zeider took a spitter for one ball, then hit the second for a high bounder to (Heinie) Zimmerman.  Bodie tried to score, but Zimmerman ran in stabbed the ball with his bare hand and got Bodie at the plate.”

The picture shows where Zimmerman was playing Zeider (B) and where he fielded the ball (A).

The picture shows where Zimmerman was playing Zeider (B) and where he fielded the ball (A).  Ping Bodie is tagged out by Cubs catcher Jimmy Archer.

The second game of the series also ended in a tie, 3 to 3.  The Cubs then won three straight, but the White Sox came back and won four in a row to take the series.

The 31-year-old Walsh, who was 27-17 in 62 games (41 starts, 32 complete games) and 393 innings pitched,  appeared in six games for the Sox, starting four.  He would only win 13 more games over parts of the next five seasons.

cubssoxmegaphone1912

1912 Cubs/Sox Megaphone coupon from The Chicago Examiner